Tag Archives: retro

Pierdom

Southend Pier by Simon RobertsSouthend-on-Sea, Essex

I’m very fond of the British seaside. Not so much in a twee “OMG, let’s take photos and eat candyfloss!” kind of way – although that can be fun – but because there is so much to genuinely love about these former tourist traps, with their juxtaposed tackiness and architectural charm. I spent a lot of my childhood holidaying in Britain, as opposed to going on package holidays to places like Tenerife or The Costa del Sol. I felt quite envious of my classmates, who got to travel on an aeroplane and were guaranteed sunshine but, looking back, I think that spending rainy days in a caravan in Scotland and having trips out to Morecambe, Southport and Blackpool has made me feel more connected to the place where I was born. As I got older, I began to romanticise the typical English seaside resort because of their mix of joy, despair and faded grandeur. Of course this is present in a lot of small towns, but with the harshness of winter and idyll of summer by the coast, these extremes seem…amplified. This isn’t just some abstract feeling I have either. Although there are exceptions to this trend in prosperous locations, such as Brighton and Poole, the traditional British seaside town has long been in decline – offering the kind of unfashionably kitsch holiday that belongs to your granny and granddad’s halcyon days. A recent report called ‘Turning The Tide‘ details the deprivation present in the UK’s coastal towns – including the ones which haven’t been totally deserted by tourists. In a lot of these towns, the grand old hotels have since been converted into bedsits that are full of transients. Although I will always have a soft spot for Blackpool in particular, the reality of life there is pretty grim. In the series ‘Pierdom’, Simon Roberts focuses on Britain’s iconic Victorian piers, and his lens captures my feelings about these places perfectly. From wind-bitten, rusting structures to sun-bathed promenades, his photographs evoke the curious charm and essence of the British seaside.Hastings Pier Simon RobertsHastings, East Sussex

Boscombe Pier Simon RobertsBoscombe, Hampshire

Teignmouth Grand Pier Simon RobertsTeignmouth, Devon

Blackpool South Pier Simon RobertsBlackpool, Lancashire

More of Simon Roberts’ brilliant photography is on his website – there are more photographs from the Pierdom series, and you should also have a look at another project he has done called ‘We English‘, which focuses on English tourism in a much broader context.

Polaroids by Bastian Kalous

Bastian K A Light SeductionBastian K’s ethereal analogue photographs put all your Instagram pictures and Photoshop wizardry to shame! They have such an otherworldly quality to them, and look as though they could almost be found photographs, or developed from old negatives.Where They Say GoodnightBastian Kalous PhotographyBastian K CarouselMisty MorningMore photographs are on Bastian K’s ever-expanding Flickr account, too.

Franz Ferdinand – Right Action

Franz Ferdinand Music VideoFranz Ferdinand Saul BassFranz Ferdinand VideoRight Action VideoDiagramFranz Ferdinand Pelican BookI know this song has been around for ages, but I’ve only just seen the video for it and I LOVE IT. It’s such an amazing pastiche of mid-century modern graphic design, referencing Saul Bass, maybe a bit of Kenneth Grange, classic textbook diagrams and – my favourite – those wonderful Pelican book covers.

The video was directed by Jonas Odell, the same guy who did the constructivist-inspired video for ‘Take Me Out‘.

Women Of The Future…

Image“Women of the future will make the Moon a cleaner place to live.”

Damn straight we will! Radical sixties feminism, yeah! Future women – fellow pioneers of space travel, improving another planet through green energy and innovation. Exciting!

Hang on a second. I just re-read it. You mean that women are just expected to clean stuff on the Moon, like we’re expected to on Earth? Oh, shit…

The Black Angels – Indigo Meadow

ImageThe Black Angels have a new album out next week, and the artwork that goes with it is all so fitting and perfect. The psychedelic line drawings evoke Wes Wilson’s classic ’60s gig posters, and the brown parcel paper texture really emphasises that beautiful hand-drawn aesthetic.ImageImageI’ve tried to find out who the illustrator is, but I’ve not had any luck. If anyone knows who the work is by, please feel free to comment and let me know. Thanks!

Edit: The work is by the very talented Matt Cliff, who unfortunately doesn’t have a website. Thanks for getting in touch, Matt!

New BRMC Material

BRMC Let The Day BeginBRMC Audio ManualThe new Black Rebel Motorcycle Club website is really cool – great design for a really simple idea.BRMC Specter At The FeastAwful American-English spelling aside, I really like ‘Specter At The Feast’, too. I’m looking forward to hearing some of the new songs live at Brixton Academy later in the month. I think my favourites are probably ‘Lullaby’, ‘Hate The Taste’ and ‘Sell It’.

Tomorrowland

Ben Sandler‘s photographic series ‘Tomorrowland’ really reminds me of Gregory Crewdson’s seminal photography. Although the pictures in Sandler’s series are more colourful and vibrant, they still capture a kind of surreal sadness. Each character within the photograph appears to be morose, almost as though they are on the verge of tears or they are about to do something drastic. As Crewdson says of his own work, “My pictures are about a search for a moment – a perfect moment.”